An observation of APD CIT training: “Because we didn’t know how to reach out to you without making it worse.”

Far too often lately (over the last year and a half), with the multitude of hardships I’ve faced, I’ve not garnered the sorts of sympathies one would expect from friends or even colleagues.

The leading excuse for saying nothing at all has been . . .


We didn’t know how to approach you and thought we’d make things “worse.”


I must assume this is because I’ve been a peer in crisis. I extrapolate this from “thought we’d make it worse.”

Er . . . So because I’m a peer in crisis, naturally I should be treated differently. Almost as if stereotyping and stigmatization are the best choices for handling a colleague on an advisement board like MHRAC.


What the heck have I been training you guys to do when it comes to deescalation of peers in crisis?


This is a topic I’ll be exploring, considering I won’t be resigning from any of these committees I’ve worked so hard to develop.

Think of it in these terms:


How can I feel confident officers in the field are usung the skills I’ve trained them for if they can’t employ these skills with a peer they know and work with intimately? And how can I tell peers who trust me that APD CIT training is working without being hypocritical?


It’s a crisis of faith, with a parting nod that I did not include persona non grata in the CIT training.

Think it over. This is a topic worth exploring.

Share
This entry was posted in Beyond Support Groups, Community. Bookmark the permalink.